cah:

House of Cards Against Humanity
On Monday we quietly announced and sold out of a little pack of cards we made for Netflix to promote the new season of House of Cards, which comes out on February 14th.
This was a weird project, even by our standards. Here’s how it happened.
The Idea
Netflix emailed us on December 13th and asked if we’d be interested in working with them on a small pack of cards to promote House of Cards. We have no idea why they thought a scatological party game would convince people to binge-watch a sophisticated political thriller - possibly because they both have the word “cards” in the name.
We’ve become pretty skeptical of these kinds of emails; we get a lot of them, and on the few occasions when we’ve tried to work with a big company, we usually get burned by them and quit (looking at you Microsoft and HBO).
On one of our calls, Netflix told us that if they ever do another project with Arrested Development we could write cards about it, so we decided that in this case, compromising with a bunch of humorless, corporate suits was worth it.
Writing the Pack
To write the pack, we first had to watch the show. It was pretty good, but we had no idea what was going on with these paper cranes that kept appearing in every episode.
Then we met with House of Cards’ show runner Beau Willimon, who also had no idea what was going on with the paper cranes, and asked us to make a joke about the scene where Kate Mara is getting eaten out while she’s on the phone with her dad.
We submitted about 41 cards to Netflix, and they rejected the ones they didn’t like, like “Binge-watching 12 hours of House of Cards while wearing an adult diaper,” because they “didn’t like their brand being associated with adult diapers.” (They also rejected a lot of other amazing cards, but they told us we weren’t allowed to say them in this blog post).
Then Netflix announced the pack Monday morning on their Twitter account and sold out 10,000 packs in about 45 minutes, and we wrote this contractually-obligated blog post, which went through one week of revisions and arguments in which Netflix stripped out many of the interesting things we wanted to tell you.
Downloading the Pack
Unfortunately the pack is totally sold out but you can download a text list of the cards or a print-at-home version at HouseOfCardsAgainstHumanity.com.
One More Thing

Netflix paid us a lot of money to write the pack (they won’t allow us to say how much they paid us). It’s not really our business model to get paid by a big company to write jokes, so we donated an amount of money that is more than $49,999 and less than $50,001 to one of our favorite non-profits, The Sunlight Foundation.
cah:

House of Cards Against Humanity
On Monday we quietly announced and sold out of a little pack of cards we made for Netflix to promote the new season of House of Cards, which comes out on February 14th.
This was a weird project, even by our standards. Here’s how it happened.
The Idea
Netflix emailed us on December 13th and asked if we’d be interested in working with them on a small pack of cards to promote House of Cards. We have no idea why they thought a scatological party game would convince people to binge-watch a sophisticated political thriller - possibly because they both have the word “cards” in the name.
We’ve become pretty skeptical of these kinds of emails; we get a lot of them, and on the few occasions when we’ve tried to work with a big company, we usually get burned by them and quit (looking at you Microsoft and HBO).
On one of our calls, Netflix told us that if they ever do another project with Arrested Development we could write cards about it, so we decided that in this case, compromising with a bunch of humorless, corporate suits was worth it.
Writing the Pack
To write the pack, we first had to watch the show. It was pretty good, but we had no idea what was going on with these paper cranes that kept appearing in every episode.
Then we met with House of Cards’ show runner Beau Willimon, who also had no idea what was going on with the paper cranes, and asked us to make a joke about the scene where Kate Mara is getting eaten out while she’s on the phone with her dad.
We submitted about 41 cards to Netflix, and they rejected the ones they didn’t like, like “Binge-watching 12 hours of House of Cards while wearing an adult diaper,” because they “didn’t like their brand being associated with adult diapers.” (They also rejected a lot of other amazing cards, but they told us we weren’t allowed to say them in this blog post).
Then Netflix announced the pack Monday morning on their Twitter account and sold out 10,000 packs in about 45 minutes, and we wrote this contractually-obligated blog post, which went through one week of revisions and arguments in which Netflix stripped out many of the interesting things we wanted to tell you.
Downloading the Pack
Unfortunately the pack is totally sold out but you can download a text list of the cards or a print-at-home version at HouseOfCardsAgainstHumanity.com.
One More Thing

Netflix paid us a lot of money to write the pack (they won’t allow us to say how much they paid us). It’s not really our business model to get paid by a big company to write jokes, so we donated an amount of money that is more than $49,999 and less than $50,001 to one of our favorite non-profits, The Sunlight Foundation.
cah:

House of Cards Against Humanity
On Monday we quietly announced and sold out of a little pack of cards we made for Netflix to promote the new season of House of Cards, which comes out on February 14th.
This was a weird project, even by our standards. Here’s how it happened.
The Idea
Netflix emailed us on December 13th and asked if we’d be interested in working with them on a small pack of cards to promote House of Cards. We have no idea why they thought a scatological party game would convince people to binge-watch a sophisticated political thriller - possibly because they both have the word “cards” in the name.
We’ve become pretty skeptical of these kinds of emails; we get a lot of them, and on the few occasions when we’ve tried to work with a big company, we usually get burned by them and quit (looking at you Microsoft and HBO).
On one of our calls, Netflix told us that if they ever do another project with Arrested Development we could write cards about it, so we decided that in this case, compromising with a bunch of humorless, corporate suits was worth it.
Writing the Pack
To write the pack, we first had to watch the show. It was pretty good, but we had no idea what was going on with these paper cranes that kept appearing in every episode.
Then we met with House of Cards’ show runner Beau Willimon, who also had no idea what was going on with the paper cranes, and asked us to make a joke about the scene where Kate Mara is getting eaten out while she’s on the phone with her dad.
We submitted about 41 cards to Netflix, and they rejected the ones they didn’t like, like “Binge-watching 12 hours of House of Cards while wearing an adult diaper,” because they “didn’t like their brand being associated with adult diapers.” (They also rejected a lot of other amazing cards, but they told us we weren’t allowed to say them in this blog post).
Then Netflix announced the pack Monday morning on their Twitter account and sold out 10,000 packs in about 45 minutes, and we wrote this contractually-obligated blog post, which went through one week of revisions and arguments in which Netflix stripped out many of the interesting things we wanted to tell you.
Downloading the Pack
Unfortunately the pack is totally sold out but you can download a text list of the cards or a print-at-home version at HouseOfCardsAgainstHumanity.com.
One More Thing

Netflix paid us a lot of money to write the pack (they won’t allow us to say how much they paid us). It’s not really our business model to get paid by a big company to write jokes, so we donated an amount of money that is more than $49,999 and less than $50,001 to one of our favorite non-profits, The Sunlight Foundation.
cah:

House of Cards Against Humanity
On Monday we quietly announced and sold out of a little pack of cards we made for Netflix to promote the new season of House of Cards, which comes out on February 14th.
This was a weird project, even by our standards. Here’s how it happened.
The Idea
Netflix emailed us on December 13th and asked if we’d be interested in working with them on a small pack of cards to promote House of Cards. We have no idea why they thought a scatological party game would convince people to binge-watch a sophisticated political thriller - possibly because they both have the word “cards” in the name.
We’ve become pretty skeptical of these kinds of emails; we get a lot of them, and on the few occasions when we’ve tried to work with a big company, we usually get burned by them and quit (looking at you Microsoft and HBO).
On one of our calls, Netflix told us that if they ever do another project with Arrested Development we could write cards about it, so we decided that in this case, compromising with a bunch of humorless, corporate suits was worth it.
Writing the Pack
To write the pack, we first had to watch the show. It was pretty good, but we had no idea what was going on with these paper cranes that kept appearing in every episode.
Then we met with House of Cards’ show runner Beau Willimon, who also had no idea what was going on with the paper cranes, and asked us to make a joke about the scene where Kate Mara is getting eaten out while she’s on the phone with her dad.
We submitted about 41 cards to Netflix, and they rejected the ones they didn’t like, like “Binge-watching 12 hours of House of Cards while wearing an adult diaper,” because they “didn’t like their brand being associated with adult diapers.” (They also rejected a lot of other amazing cards, but they told us we weren’t allowed to say them in this blog post).
Then Netflix announced the pack Monday morning on their Twitter account and sold out 10,000 packs in about 45 minutes, and we wrote this contractually-obligated blog post, which went through one week of revisions and arguments in which Netflix stripped out many of the interesting things we wanted to tell you.
Downloading the Pack
Unfortunately the pack is totally sold out but you can download a text list of the cards or a print-at-home version at HouseOfCardsAgainstHumanity.com.
One More Thing

Netflix paid us a lot of money to write the pack (they won’t allow us to say how much they paid us). It’s not really our business model to get paid by a big company to write jokes, so we donated an amount of money that is more than $49,999 and less than $50,001 to one of our favorite non-profits, The Sunlight Foundation.

cah:

House of Cards Against Humanity

On Monday we quietly announced and sold out of a little pack of cards we made for Netflix to promote the new season of House of Cards, which comes out on February 14th.

This was a weird project, even by our standards. Here’s how it happened.

The Idea

Netflix emailed us on December 13th and asked if we’d be interested in working with them on a small pack of cards to promote House of Cards. We have no idea why they thought a scatological party game would convince people to binge-watch a sophisticated political thriller - possibly because they both have the word “cards” in the name.

We’ve become pretty skeptical of these kinds of emails; we get a lot of them, and on the few occasions when we’ve tried to work with a big company, we usually get burned by them and quit (looking at you Microsoft and HBO).

On one of our calls, Netflix told us that if they ever do another project with Arrested Development we could write cards about it, so we decided that in this case, compromising with a bunch of humorless, corporate suits was worth it.

Writing the Pack

To write the pack, we first had to watch the show. It was pretty good, but we had no idea what was going on with these paper cranes that kept appearing in every episode.

Then we met with House of Cards’ show runner Beau Willimon, who also had no idea what was going on with the paper cranes, and asked us to make a joke about the scene where Kate Mara is getting eaten out while she’s on the phone with her dad.

We submitted about 41 cards to Netflix, and they rejected the ones they didn’t like, like “Binge-watching 12 hours of House of Cards while wearing an adult diaper,” because they “didn’t like their brand being associated with adult diapers.” (They also rejected a lot of other amazing cards, but they told us we weren’t allowed to say them in this blog post).

Then Netflix announced the pack Monday morning on their Twitter account and sold out 10,000 packs in about 45 minutes, and we wrote this contractually-obligated blog post, which went through one week of revisions and arguments in which Netflix stripped out many of the interesting things we wanted to tell you.

Downloading the Pack

Unfortunately the pack is totally sold out but you can download a text list of the cards or a print-at-home version at HouseOfCardsAgainstHumanity.com.

One More Thing

Netflix paid us a lot of money to write the pack (they won’t allow us to say how much they paid us). It’s not really our business model to get paid by a big company to write jokes, so we donated an amount of money that is more than $49,999 and less than $50,001 to one of our favorite non-profits, The Sunlight Foundation.

Review: Rick and Morty Pilot Episode

Review: Rick and Morty Pilot

Grade: A

By William Vessio

Review: Rick and Morty Pilot

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Rick and Morty, the new cartoon on the niche Adult Swim block on Cartoon Network, is notable for two reasons:  it marks the ceremonious return to television for Community creator Dan Harmon, and it’s outrageously funny. The pilot episode opens with the perpetually inebriated mad scientist Rick dragging his grandson Morty out of his bed in order to help with an unspecified late night mission. Turns out the mission is to bomb the world and create and Adam and Eve like scenario for Morty and his crush at school, to which Morty protests in his understated, ineffectual manner. Rick eventually passes out, the clock is ticking down for the bomb, and Morty stands there, completely unsure of what to do. That’s it, cut to the title sequence.

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Review: The Great Gatsby

Review: The Great Gatsby

Grade: D

By: William Vessio

Review: The Great Gatsby (2013)

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     The Great Gatsby has long been the scourge of the movie viewing public. Its story has right been recognized for its genius, its scope, and its enduring themes of the falsity of American dream, the class differences of the rich and the poor, and the ceaseless if fruitless hope that you can change the past. The only problem is getting that all to translate to film. Previous efforts have fallen short, always failing to step out of the shadow of the great American novel. The films instead become somewhat unloved footnotes to the story. But why is that? Well, it could be that the novel is short, by novel standards, and the movie needs to fill that extra time. It could be that the most evocative writing in the story arrives from the unspoken prose of narrator Nick Carroway, channeling F. Scott Fitzgerald, and the easiest way to capture that is through the use of a clichéd voice over. The imagery is beautiful but the action is lacking, by movie standards. So how does this latest effort to recreate an American classic fair? About as well as a late summer swim with Jay Gatsby.

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Review: House of Cards

House of Cards

Grade: A

By Scott Wong

Review: House of Cards

It’s tough being a television show nowadays when every other show on-air is on such a high level of standards. What I mean by that is, judging by the following and content of shows from the last 5 years, we’ve set standards pretty high. Series like The Sopranos to Breaking Bad, it’s tough to follow. My two-cents on who could be the next contender: House of Cards.  It is a series that’s been getting a lot of prestigious buzz amongst critics. With being the first Netflix original to be released on the platform, coupled with its Emmy nominations, it’s safe to say House of Cards is bringing a lot of attention onto the television industry.

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Review: On The Road

On The Road by Jack Kerouac

Grade: B+

By Scott Wong

Book Review: On The Road

            When I asked around, trying to figure out whether or not I should read On the Road, a lot of my friends never heard of it. I first heard about the Jack Kerouac novel when I was at the movies; the trailer for the film adaptation featured Kristen Stewart and I’ll admit that’s what got me interested. The book follows Sal Paradise, a writer who is in the process of finishing his own book. Through a mutual friend, Sal meets Dean Moriarty. Sal befriends Dean and is instantly interested in his personality and charisma. Dean catalyzes the carefree spirit Sal so enviously wants. They both set off to explore America for “kicks,” while facing the hardships and issues of the time period.

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Review: This Is the End

This Is the End

Grade: B+

By William Vessio

Review: This Is the End

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                In This Is the End, Seth Rogen and a few of his closest actor-buddies play fictionalized versions of themselves as the literal, biblical apocalypse happens all around them. Meanwhile, there’s also the story of Jay Baruchel and Seth Rogen’s friendship struggling because one of them has moved on and the other hasn’t evolved and blah blah blah this movie is really about making jokes at each participant’s expense. And it does it so well and so frequently that, providing you can stomach some of the more raunchy material, you’ll be laughing the whole way through.

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Product Placement or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Dove Men’s Shampoo

By William Vessio

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       Story-telling has become harder in recent years: TV shows are harder to pitch, fund, and implement than ever before. In an industry more preoccupied with the bottom line than the artistry that goes into story, production companies are shooting down ideas that are not immediately money grabbing or fit neatly into bizarrely specific existing genres. This focus has led to hundreds of implications, from the rise of the sequel to massive media consolidation, but by far the least subtle of these ramifications has been an increasing amount of product placement.

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